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    18:53 PM
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    92 Tb
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    383
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History

The first lord of Angludet, who is referred to in a deed from 1273, was Bertrand d'Angludet, a knight who also owned another fief in Bouliac. In all likelihood, the vineyard has been here since the beginning of the 17th century (Cassini‘s map - 1758).

In 1791, following the death of the then owner, Pierre Legras, the estate was divided up among his four heirs. As a result of this division, Château Angludet did not figure in the classification of Médoc vineyards in 1855.

In 1891, under the auspices of Jules Jadouin, the property was reconsolidated into a single unit of 130 hectares, 55 of which were planted with vines.

In 1932, Château Angludet was one of six châteaux to be promoted to the rank of Cru Bourgeois Exceptionnel.

The estate then passed into the hands of Paul Six for a period of nearly twenty years. Six was an industrialist who preferred to devote more time to his business activities than his vines and the vineyard consequently suffered neglect.

From 1953 on wards, Mr Thomas, the new owner, embarked on a major replanting programme but the harshwinter of 1956 destroyed all the young plants. Economic difficulties prevented the replanting of the lost vineyards, which were replaced by barley and wheat. In 1960, Angludet's vine covered a mere 7 hectares.

In 1961, Diana and Peter Sichel, the parents of the current generation of Sichels, bought the estate after falling in love with this unique site.

Since then, Château Angludet has been the seat of the Sichel family.

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Vineyards

Today, the vines, - which are 25 years old on average and planted at a density of 6,666 to 7,300 vines per hectare, consist of a balanced mix of 46% Cabernet Sauvignon, 41% Merlot and 13% Petit Verdot. Vines were probably first grown at Angludet at the beginning of the 17th century. The Angludet vineyard is shown on Cassini's map of 1758 with a configuration very close to that of the present day - the kind of out standing continuity despite the ups and downs of history which you find only among the very best terroirs.

Cabernet Sauvignon provides the structure and back bone typical of wines without standing ageing qualities and helps to retain complexity during the ageing process. Merlot affords roundness and charm, while the Petit Verdot, which comes from the estate's oldest parcel of vines, adds complexity, finesse and character. These three grape varieties are the hallmark of the greatest Margaux wines.

 

Surface area : 23.4 hectares (58 acres) in one single block
Situation : On the south-facing slope of Saint-Emilion, on the famous “pied de côte” (foot of the slope)
Soils : Clay-limestone in the high part, clay-sand-limestone on the hillside slopes.
Density of plantation : 6,500 to 7,500 plants per hectare
Grape varieties : 50% Merlot, 47% Cabernet Franc, 3% Cabernet Sauvignon
Average age of the vines : 30 years
Pruning technique : “Girondine”, leaving two canes
Vineyard management : Vines are grown in the traditional manner. Some of the rows are seeded with grass. Debudding, then crop thinning in summer
Harvesting : 100% by hand. The grapes are sorted on the vine and on three sorting tables at the cellar
De-stemming : 100%
Annual crop yield : 30 to 35 hectolitres per hectare

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Winemaking

When Benjamin Sichel took charge of wine-making operations at Château Angludet in 1989, he set himself the task of optimising the vines' natural balance. In Benjamin's view, the vines ought to be allowed to regulate themselves naturally, without any assistance. The role of the groweris to provide the means to foster this balance.

Consequently, in winter, severe pruning limits the potential production of each vine to eight bunches per plant, to produce 45 hectolitres per hectare.

A leaf surface area of 1.2m² per grapevine fosters ripening, and grass cover is used when necessary to curb excessive vigour. Plant cover may be used to fertilise and promote microbial activity in the earth and raise soil quality. In addition to these techniques, manual leaf thinning helps aerate the bunches, while green harvesting is the ultimate means of regulating grapevine yield and ensuring uniform veraison.

This skilful blend of integrated, organic and alternative management practices protects the environment and preserves the terroir for future generations.Fermentation takes place in concrete vats which offer the advantage of excellent thermal inertia during the maceration phase.Fermentation and extraction of the grape skin components are adjusted according to the potential of the vintage to help preserve its typical characteristics.

The wine is then aged in barrels for 12 months. Every year, 30-35% of new oak barrels are introduced, sourced from a number of cooperages carefully selected to ensure complementarity; these barrels play a role in the ageing and complexity of the wine.

The wine is lightly fined with egg white before bottling.

However, at Château Angludet more than anywhere else, we know that there is no single, lasting recipe: every year, we question current practices to be able to act in response to the meteorological conditions and the state of the vines.

 

The Cabernet Franc - Could it be one of our oldest grape varieties?

In his ampelographical treatise of 1909, P. Viala stated that the etymology of its name and its synonyms go way back in history and referred to a scholar of the 17th century called Petit Lafitte, who appeared to claim that the Vidure (the Petite Vidure or the Grosse Vidure)-its Bordeaux name, was the ancestor of the Biturica. He bases his opinion on the hypothesis that the word Vidure may come from the word Bidure, then Biturica. It was from the 19th century that the Cabernet Franc could be found in written works. In 1829, in his “Classification of the Wines of Bordeaux and Specific Grape Varieties”, the wine broker M. Paguierre found it to be “delicate with a bright deep colour and with superior flavour”. Then in 1855, in “Vine-growing, Vinification and Wine” by M. d’Armailhacq, an article by the Count Odart stated that the wine it produces is “fine, full of bouquet and long-ageing”.

 

At this time already, specific reference was being made to the very notion of terroir and the nature of the soils. He also wrote that “according to the spot where it was planted, the results were different: on limestone soils the wine was outstanding; on gravel over clay subsoil it produced a wine that was rich in colour and long ageing; on light sands the wine was light and had limited ageing potential; in tuff the wines were of no interest, it was flat and colourless”. In other words, the place where it was planted and its supply of water were of great importance. We are also told that the wine of this variety “keeps for a very long time and gains in bouquet and delicacy over 12 to 15 years... and it can keep well up to 20 years”. In 1868, Cocks et Ferret described it as having “ leaves which were comparable to those of the Cabernet Sauvignon, they are slightly less fine and less shiny, their indentations are a little less deep; its canes are long and covered with light brown-greyish bark, which led to its name Cabernet Gris. Its bunches are less long than those of the Cabernet Sauvignon, its fruit is very flavoursome”.

 

In 1874, in his treatise on grape varieties, Count Odart said that the wine it produced in suitable terroir was “ fine, full of bouquet and long-ageing”. He added that “ it was one of the plants in Gironde that had the reputation of producing one of the most distinguished wines when the fruit reaches complete ripeness”. In 1886, again in Cocks et Ferret, we can read that the wine is “light in colour when it leaves the vat and that it becomes darker after three or four months”, a fact that we witness today during each of our vinifications. The Cabernet Franc has numerous synonyms.

 

According to “Synonymy of Ampelography” by the INRA, it can correspond to different origins and types:    Achéria –the Basque country, Arrouya – the Jurançon region, Bouchet or Gros Bouchet – around Libourne, Bouchey or Boubet - the Adour basin, Breton – the Loire valley, Capbreton rouge and Messange rouge – the Landes sands, Gouhaort – Madiran, Noir dur – Loiret, Grosse Vidure and Carmenet – the Bordeaux area, Véronais – Saumur, Cabernet Gris and Petit Fer – around Libourne, Carbouet – Bazas area. P. Galet, in “Grape Varieties and Vineyards of France” described it in 1962 as a “ small producer”. Jancis Robinson, in her1986    book on grape varieties wrote, “ it participates in Saint-Emilion in the production of absolutely superb wines. Its aromas are of raspberries, violets and pencil shavings”. She reminds us that a report dating from the 18th century, quoted by Professor    Enjalbert, considered it particularly well adapted to the Libourne vineyards.

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Highlights

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Wine Moments

Here you can see wine moments from tastingbook users.    or    to see wine moments from your world.

 Markus Del Monego MW , Wine Writer (Germany)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  650 wines 

2020 – the paradox vintage 


2020 began with mild temperatures even breaking temperature record highs at the beginning of February. These conditions led to a premature budbreak. Budding developed unevenly, very much depending on the locations although the coo and humid weather in April had not a very significant impact on slowing down the growth of the vines. Finally all the vines came into bloom at the end of May without any significant coulure or millerandage. At the start of June, frequent rain intensified the pressure of mildew. From mid-June, the weather changed. The whole Bordelais saw a period of very dry weather for two months. However, the earlier accumulation of water reserves prevented water stress. Around July 18 a heat wave began to build up but the cool nighty prevented water stress on the wines again. The veraison started at the end of July and went on till the beginning of August. The heatwave in August accentuated water stress, but shorter rainy episodes avoided a complete block. The dry and sunny weather in September encouraged the grapes maturity and harvest started on September 10 with a rather mild weather. Towards the middle of September, rain prevented the fruits from wilting but as its frequency was quite concerning, the haves was pushed forward. "Le diabolique" is the title given to this vintage by Véronique Sanders. It is a very special French word, which is not correctly translated with “diabolic” in English. In France, the expression means to overcome the devil. And the vintners succeeded. 2020 is clearly a vintner’s vintage which asked a permanent reinvention of the wineries, struggling hard with this difficult vintage. However, the vintage surprises with excellent wines, exemplary freshness and elegance and very dense structure. In former times it was said that the vine has to suffer to make exquisite wines, in this vintage the people have suffered to make a great wine. The first part of notes for this tasting with over 800 wines you will find today. More notes will follow over the coming days.

2m 24d ago

 Markus Del Monego MW , Wine Writer (Germany)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  32 wines 

The Union des Grands Crus hold the en primeur tasting at the Palmengarten in Frankfurt. A great opportunity to get some more samples to complete the tasting notes and to re-taste some of the wines tasted earlier. 

1y 1m ago

 Christer Byklum , Wine Writer (Norway)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  41 wines 

2016 Graham's Vintage Port / Opaque. Rich, fruity, dense, blackberries, spices, blueberries, anise nose. Fresh acidity, ripe tannins, dark fruity, anise, spices, liquorice, dense, almost creamy texture, long. 96p

2y 5m ago

 Christer Byklum , Wine Writer (Norway)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  42 wines 

2014 Château Mouton Rothschild / Ruby. Anise, spices, liquorice, exotic spices, cassis, blueberries, light minerals note beneath, layered nose, beautiful depth. Fresh acidity, ripe tannins, fruity, anise, cassis, blueberries, layered and nuanced, spices, blackberries, exotic spices, bazar, minerals, layered and deep. 97

3y 5m ago

 Christer Byklum , Wine Writer (Norway)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  55 wines 

Finally, after some busy days tasting back home in Oslo, here is 2016 Margaux. A vintage with a lot of success in this commune as well. Beautiful texture, pure fruits and that gorgeous scented in abundance almost Margaux typicity that is shining very clearly this year. Another stellar commune in 2016.

4y 3m ago

 Andrew Caillard MW, Wine Writer (Australia)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  126 wines 

Every now and again one stumbles across a paradox that confounds the accepted natural order of things. The 2016 Bordeaux vintage was born out of a growing season that was near-catastrophe and near-perfection. After the Hesperian Dragon’s relentless torment, the Titan God Atlas had seemingly kept the sky aloft with the help of a Phoenix. Following five months of diabolical weather patterns, a warm to hot dry summer arrived in the nick of time, not only saving a vintage, but creating one of the most spectacular vintages in a lifetime.


 The sense of relief in Bordeaux must have been as thrilling as avoiding the bullet of Russian Roulette, or the adrenalin of surviving a base-jump. The razor’s edge has never been so exquisitely fine. While the end result is not always perfect, with the odd abrasions here and there, the overall quality of the 2016 Bordeaux vintage is remarkably consistent with many Chateaux making some of their best wines in 50 years. Typically, the wines have deep colours, pure fruit aromatics, generous saturated flavours, dense rich tannin structures and bell clear acidities. Precision, freshness, elegance, smoothness and “delicate opulence” are words that are being used by various Chateaux to describe their wines.


 The Bordelais are, of course, the world’s greatest spin doctors. They leave snake charmers for dead when it comes to the art of mesmerising. The newly opened and impressive Cité du Vin, which sits on the banks of the Garonne River in Bordeaux, sparkles like a polished turd; a monument to the exaggerations and optimism of this particular type of fine wine game. Momentum is achieved through belief. There is no room for wavering or self-doubt.

4y 3m ago

 Markus Del Monego MW , Wine Writer (Germany)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  272 wines 

BORDEAUX VINTAGE 2016 / Tasting "en primeur" is a challenge every year. The wines tasted are showing a tendency only and it is still the beginning of a longer process of evolution and maturation in the barrels. There might be some changes during the next year and a half until the wines will be bottled, but already today the tendency is quite clear. For most of the red wines it will be an outstanding vintage, a vintage for Cabernet, old vines, limestone and clay soil. It was a challenging year for the vintners. An incredibly wet spring was worrying the winegrowers and at the beginning of June, the spirits were down. However warm and dry weather between June 3 and June 11 creating an close to ideal situation for the flowering and good weather conditions starting in mid June changed the nature of the vintage. The fine weather continued into July and August. The month of August was featuring hot weather and a remarkable amount of sunshine but the absence of rain let to water stress. Heavy rain in mid September set an end to water stress and when the sun returned on September 20 the vintage was saved as there was excellent weather till to the end of the harvest. The effects were various. the white wines are on a good quality level and display fruit and flavour but the acidity is lower than in previous vintages and the white wines show an opulent and rather soft style. The noble sweet wines are extremely pure and are more on the rich and powerful side than on the freshness. For the red wines originating from the right terroirs and old vines, the vintage an be called outstanding. Water stress was managed well on limestone and clay terroirs, Cabernet varieties did extremely well and old vines found water even during the stressful dry periods of summer. In some few red wines the tannins are slightly harsh, almost bitter, a result of water stress and/or intense extraction. In general the red wines are on an excellent level with an advantage for the left bank, mainly the Médoc area, and the classic great terroirs of Saint-Emilion and Pomerol. 

4y 3m ago

 Dylan O'Brien / Sommelier, Pro (Ireland)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  36 wines 

Bordeaux left bank vintage 2012 tasting.

4y 9m ago

 Andrew Caillard MW, Wine Writer (Australia)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  104 wines 

“Bordeaux Vintage 2015 Part I / Vieux Château Certan 2015:100 points: Deep colour. Fresh aromatic musky dark plum aromas with praline, fine espresso, vanilla oak. Sweet dark cherry, musky plum praline violet flavours, beautiful long fine chalky silky tannins, superb savoury oak complexity and mid palate viscosity.  Fine dry grainy finish with beautiful flavour length. A very sophisticated wine with lovely freshness and line. Finesse and elegance. ”

5y 3m ago

 Markus Del Monego MW , Wine Writer (Germany)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  502 wines 

“2015 will be one of the excellent vintages however hardly to compare to 2009 and 2010 or 2005. In 2015 the region played a major role, terroir was the key to success. For red wines, the limestone plateau in Saint-Emilion performed extremely well as there was water available during the hot summer days and drainage proved to be ideal during rainy August. Therefore the best wines of Saint-Emilion come from limestone soils. The sandy parts of the appellation produced a quite heterogeneous result. In Pomerol it looked the same with very successful wines from the central plateau and more heterogeneous qualities from the areas around. In Fronsac it was not only the terroir which proved important, the vintners decision had a major impact. Pessac-Léognan did extremely well in this vintage with a homogenous quality. The Médoc was divided. The southern part, mainly Margaux and the southern part of Saint-Julien have seen less rain and produced more powerful wines. The northern part of the Médoc, especially Pauillac and Saint-Estèphe have produced a very fine and elegant style with excellent persistence. On the good terroirs, the seeds were ripe which results in very ripe tannins with a silky or velvety expression. In addition the cooler conditions of autumn provoked a very pure and fresh fruit. For the dry white wines the quality depends very much on the origin again. Due to the hot and dry growing season, a lot of white wines show very mild, almost soft acidity but also some phenolic hints in the aftertaste. A few dry white wines are standing out, having preserved freshness and acidity. The sweet wines are remarkably good, very rich in character and the best of them have a crisp acidity balancing the opulent sugar. The tasting conditions were rather good, however the weather was quite mixed affecting the presentation of the wines. The wines were tasted blind where possible and open. The final decision on the rating is based on both tasting types.”

5y 3m ago

 Wallace Shawn / Wine Investing Consult, Wine Merchant (Luxembourg)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  30 wines 

“Bordeaux 1964 tasting. Pomerol, Saint-Émilion and Graves produced some exceptional wines in a vintage where almost every other appellation in Bordeaux suffered as a result of torrential rainfall during the harvest.
The best examples rivalled those of the 1961 vintage, but the vast majority reached their peak by the mid-1980s, and only the very best will last another 10 or so years.”

5y 4m ago

 Christer Byklum , Wine Writer (Norway)  tasted  1 wines  from  Château D´Angludet . In a tasting of  44 wines 

“Bordeaux 2012's plus older vintages, Special release at the Monopoly.”

5y 7m ago

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