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BURGUNDY 2017 - In 2017, everything came good for the Bourgogne winegrowing region in terms of both quality and quantity. And after several years of harvests that suffered the whims of the weather, 2017 has provided volumes set to satisfy the market, with wines that are already promising great things to come from this elegant vintage. 

After spending the winter building up their strength, the vines profited fully from a very warm spring, with budburst in early April ensuring a head start in terms of the growth cycle that was maintained right up to the harvest. The plants progressed from stage to stage free from hindrance, and by mid - June, were flowerin g before rapid fruit set. An early vintage was confirmed.

During the summer, a few spells of heatwave alternated with more mixed weather. However, ripening continued at a good pace and by the end of August, the first grapes were being picked, two weeks a head of average . Harvesting continued until mid - September as each plot reached peak maturity . The grapes were in exceptional health and required virtually no sorting. Everyone was very enthu siastic about this fabulous fruit, its peak ripeness, and the volumes produced. The only downside were a few areas hit by spring frosts , where yields were below norms .

Vinification went without a hitch and the mood was one of serenity for this vintage wh en the Bourgogne winegrowing region returned to more habitual levels of quality and quantity.   

WHITE WINES

From the north to the south of the Bourgogne winegrowing region, opinion is unanimous: The 2017 vintage is one of the most elegant expressions of the Chardonnay grape, with perfectly balanced wines and a wonderful aromatic profile. They are crisp , with notes of citrus and white - fleshed fruit. Aeration triggers the release of h ints of peach and apricot, while in the mouth, minerality and tension balance out this rich, fruit - filled palette. A very fine vintage indeed!   

RED WINES

Intense, dazzling colors ranging from ruby to garnet. From first glance, these wines simply invite one to taste them. Notes of red and black berries in these extremely expressive wines are another sign of indulgence, while perfect balance in the mouth comb ined with silky tannins results in a very harmonious ensemble that is subtle and without opulence.     

 

 

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Vintage Report

Smaller New Zealand wine vintage is full of promise / The 2017 grape harvest has come in smaller than expected according to New Zealand Winegrowers. 

The 2017 Vintage Survey shows the harvest totalled 396,000 tonnes, down 9% on last year said Philip Gregan, CEO of New Zealand Winegrowers. “Given strong demand in overseas markets wineries had been looking forward to a larger harvest this year. With the smaller vintage however, export volume growth is likely to be more muted in the year ahead.” 

Mr Gregan said the smaller vintage was due to weather conditions. “Generally summer weather was very positive but there were some challenges as the season progressed.”

 

In terms of vintage quality Mr Gregan said wineries were confident the vintage would deliver the fruit flavours that New Zealand wine is renowned for. “Reports from across the wine regions indicate that generally wineries are positive about the vintage quality. However, as always the ultimate test will be how the market reacts to the wines when they are released. At this stage we are confident the 2017 vintage wines will add to New Zealand’s reputation as a premium producer of cool climate wines.” 

New Zealand wine is exported to more than 90 countries and wine exports are currently valued at $1.65 billion per annum. Wine is New Zealand’s 5th biggest export good. 

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Vintage Report

2017 - A qualitatively good vintage said Austrian Viticultural Association

“Austria’s winegrowers are currently anticipating a quantitatively good vintage with very ripe and healthy grapes”, said Johannes Schmuckenschlager, president of the Viticultural Association.  

With favourable springtime weather, 2017 brings a lot of hope despite some severe frost. Some heavy rains permit fighting back against a hot and dry summer, resulting in a ‘very fine and fully ripe’ vintage, added Schmuckenschlager.

Austria is looking forward to a good average vintage:

  • The Steiermark (Styria), which was not heavily affected by the drought, is looking forward to a very satisfying vintage in terms of both quality and quantity.
  • Burgenland reports a normal sized harvest with a fine quality especially in red wines.
  • Niederösterreich (Lower Austria) and Wien (Vienna) are expecting a good, normal harvest in terms of quality.

In general, Austria estimates an average volume vintage to 2.3 million hectolitres.

 

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Vintage Report

BURGUNDY 2017 - In 2017, everything came good for the Bourgogne winegrowing region in terms of both quality and quantity. And after several years of harvests that suffered the whims of the weather, 2017 has provided volumes set to satisfy the market, with wines that are already promising great things to come from this elegant vintage. 

After spending the winter building up their strength, the vines profited fully from a very warm spring, with budburst in early April ensuring a head start in terms of the growth cycle that was maintained right up to the harvest. The plants progressed from stage to stage free from hindrance, and by mid - June, were flowerin g before rapid fruit set. An early vintage was confirmed.

During the summer, a few spells of heatwave alternated with more mixed weather. However, ripening continued at a good pace and by the end of August, the first grapes were being picked, two weeks a head of average . Harvesting continued until mid - September as each plot reached peak maturity . The grapes were in exceptional health and required virtually no sorting. Everyone was very enthu siastic about this fabulous fruit, its peak ripeness, and the volumes produced. The only downside were a few areas hit by spring frosts , where yields were below norms .

Vinification went without a hitch and the mood was one of serenity for this vintage wh en the Bourgogne winegrowing region returned to more habitual levels of quality and quantity.   

WHITE WINES

From the north to the south of the Bourgogne winegrowing region, opinion is unanimous: The 2017 vintage is one of the most elegant expressions of the Chardonnay grape, with perfectly balanced wines and a wonderful aromatic profile. They are crisp , with notes of citrus and white - fleshed fruit. Aeration triggers the release of h ints of peach and apricot, while in the mouth, minerality and tension balance out this rich, fruit - filled palette. A very fine vintage indeed!   

RED WINES

Intense, dazzling colors ranging from ruby to garnet. From first glance, these wines simply invite one to taste them. Notes of red and black berries in these extremely expressive wines are another sign of indulgence, while perfect balance in the mouth comb ined with silky tannins results in a very harmonious ensemble that is subtle and without opulence.     

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Vintage Report

Excellent quality for California’s 2017 wines

San francisco – California’s 2017 wine harvest wrapped up early this fall following summer heat spurts and a growing season that saw significant rain throughout the state ending a five-year drought. While October wildfires in North Coast wine communities made international headlines, the state’s vineyards and wineries were not significantly affected. Napa, Sonoma and Mendocino counties, the regions most impacted, grow 12 percent of California’s winegrapes, and 90% percent of the harvest in Napa and Sonoma and 85% in Mendocino were already picked and in production at wineries before the fires.

“The vast majority of California’s 2017 winegrape harvest was unaffected by the wildfires and the vintage promises to be of excellent quality,” said Robert P. (Bobby) Koch, president and CEO of Wine Institute. “The outpouring of support locally and from around the world for people in the impacted communities has been phenomenal. We are saddened by the loss of lives and homes and this will truly be remembered as a harvest of the heart. Wineries are at work making their 2017 wines and welcoming visitors dur-ing this beautiful late fall/early winter season.”

 

The Growing Season 

With all but late harvest grapes in, vintners are looking back at the 2017 growing season throughout the state. The drought is over with the season beginning with rainfall that refilled reservoirs and replenished soils. Harvest began early at a normal pace in many regions, and then progressed rapidly during a heat wave in late August and early September. Temperatures cooled mid-September, slowing the harvest pace and allowing red grapes to ripen gradually. Many regions are reporting reduced yields due to the heat spell, but vintners are reporting strong quality for the 2017 vintage. 

The California Department of Food and Agriculture estimated in early August that the state’s overall crop size would reach 4 million tons, down slightly from 4.03 million in 2016 and above the historical average of 3.9 million tons. The heat wave will likely lower this prediction. 

“We had above average rainfall this winter on the Central Coast, but not as much as areas that saw flooding,” said Steve Lohr, CEO, J. Lohr Vineyards & Wines. “It was wonderful because it helped fill up the reservoirs and bring new life to cover crops that had been parched after several years of drought. It has been a good year for us, all in all, on the Central Coast,” Lohr said. “From the 30,000-foot perspective, I would say that these wines are going to show particularly nicely in their youth but will have the capacity to age.” 

 

According to Neil Bernardi, vice president of winemaking at Duckhorn Wine Co., the increased rainfall also brought vine-vigor challenges. “It required special focus on cover crops and tillage and closely managing canopies. Cabernet Sauvignon grapes in Napa Valley and Alexander Valley look especially healthy,” he said. “Our Pinot Noir, Zinfandel and Merlot have excellent color, extraction and flavor, and Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay are showing excellent aromatics and great acidity.” 

The rainfall helped vines in the Santa Cruz Mountains rebound from the drought, but also caused some problems during flowering. “Zinfandel got caught by spring rain during bloom and most of our Zinfandel sites are down in tonnage anywhere from 15% to 40%,” said Eric Baugher, chief operating officer and winemaker, Ridge Vineyards Monte Bello Winery. “It does appear that the Zinfandel vintage will be an extraordinary one, similar to 1999. I expect similar excellent quality out of Chardonnay since the fruit had such great intensity of flavor from the petite-size clusters and berries.” 

A heat spell impacted many California regions in late summer, speeding up harvest schedules and requiring extra vigilance. “Some vineyards that had exposed fruit showed desiccation,” said David Hayman, vice president of winegrowing for Delicato Family Vineyards, which farms grapes across the state. “Ripeness was accelerated and a lot of fruit became ready all at once. Flavors across the board look good.”

 

NAPA VALLEY 

Abundant winter rains thrilled vintners and helped recharge reservoirs and groundwater. Spring weather was cool to mild, with increased vine vigor and extended flowering in some areas, but few reports of shatter. A freak June hail storm caused isolated damage, but left the crop mostly unscathed. Initially, harvest seemed like it would proceed at a leisurely rate, but that changed with the Labor Day weekend heat wave. High temperatures kicked harvest into high gear until mid-September, when cooler weather arrived to give red Bordeaux varieties some extra hang time. Vintners are optimistic about quality. Reduced yields are expected for some varieties due to discarding fruit damaged by heat and the wildfires. The whites have bright, fresh flavors and the reds are intense and rich. Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Noir and Zinfandel are showing especially good quality.

 

SONOMA COUNTY

Record-breaking winter rainfall kicked off the season, filling the water table to capacity and replenishing soils. A mild spring brought bud break at the normal time, and vintners reported small berries with excellent color. A hot summer culminated in a Labor Day weekend heat wave that caused some vintners to move up their harvest dates by a week or so. The grapes endured the heat and once cooler weather arrived, fruit was able to mature at a gradual pace. Mid-September rain forced growers open up canopies, and in some instances, use blowers to dry out certain varieties prior to harvesting. Early estimates predicted an average yield, but some vintners reported weight loss in the grapes after the heat wave. Because most of the fruit was picked prior to the October fires, vintners have a positive outlook on the 2017 wines, comparing the vintage to 2003, 2013 and 2014. The fruit has excellent color, pronounced flavors and high quality across varieties.

 

SANTA BARBARA 

The growing season got off to a good start, with generous winter rainfall and warm spring temperatures that prevented spring frost issues. The winter rains contributed to strong canopy growth and reduced the need for irrigation. High temperatures and humidity in late August and early September contributed to increased fungal pressure, but vintners reported no significant fruit damage. Harvest began in the third week of August. Fruit quality was above average, characterized by small berries with good color and concentration in the reds. Clusters were also smaller than normal, resulting in yield reductions for Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. Yields were average to nearly 50% of normal.

 

SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS 

The region experienced a remarkably wet winter with as much as 100 inches or more of rainfall on the ocean side. This brought healthy vigor to the vines, along with the need for additional canopy management, floor management and weed control. Bud break began in early to mid-March and bloom followed in late May to early June. Harvest came at the end of August, spurred by a heat wave that sent temperatures into triple digits for several days and quickly spurred harvest into overdrive. Some vineyards were affected more than others, depending on microclimates and farming practices. Crop loads were very good and quality looks fantastic for the varieties that were able to ride through the heat spell—especially Cabernet Sauvignon.

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AUSTRALIA VINTAGE REPORT: The 2017 winegrape crush is estimated to be 1.93 million tonnes, based on responses received by the Wine Sector Survey 2017. This crush is 5 per cent higher than the 2016 final crush figure of 1.84 million tonnes (Department of Agriculture and Water Resources – Levies recorded figure). It is the third consecutive vintage where the tonnes crushed have increased.

Additional tonnes this year came relatively equally from the cool and temperate regions of Australia and the warm inland regions (Riverina, Murray Darling-Swan Hill and Riverland). However, the tonnes from the cool and temperate regions increased by 9 per cent compared to a 3 per cent increase in the warm inland regions.

Most regions recorded an increase in tonnes crushed including: Riverland, Riverina, Barossa Valley, McLaren Vale, Coonawarra, Clare Valley, Wrattonbully, Margaret River, King Valley, Eden Valley, Heathcote, Tasmania, Orange, Gundagai, Grampians, Hunter Valley, Hilltops, Alpine Valleys and Rutherglen.

 

Regions where the tonnes crushed declined in 2017 included Murray Darling-Swan Hill, Langhorne Creek, Padthaway, Adelaide Hills, Currency Creek, Goulburn Valley, Cowra, Swan District, Mount Benson, Robe and Mudgee.

The 2017 red variety crush is estimated to be 1,062,660 tonnes – an increase of 112,000 tonnes (up 12 per cent) compared with 2016. The white variety crush is estimated to be 866,970 tonnes, a decrease of 19,000 tonnes (down 2 per cent) compared with 2016. Red varieties increased their share of the crush to 55 per cent, compared with 52 per cent in 2016.

The top three red varieties by volume were Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, together accounting for 85 per cent of the total red crush. Shiraz accounted for 47 per cent of the red crush (up slightly from 2016) while the Cabernet Sauvignon share fell from 27 per cent to 26 per cent and Merlot remained at 12 per cent.

Among the whites, Chardonnay remains the dominant variety. However, its share fell from 47 per cent in 2016 to 42 per cent this year with the Chardonnay crush down 13 per cent.

 

2017 will also be a good year for Grenache. It’s a grape whose time has come, and has indeed been coming for a few years. It’s a warm-climate grape that does particularly well in regions such as McLaren Vale. Now that consumers have got over their strange obsession with dark colour and lots of structure in their red wines, Grenache is allowed to do what it does best: make elegant, perfumed, somewhat lighter-coloured reds that are the equivalent of the Pinot Noir of the warmer climates.

Pinot Noir is also going from strength to strength, and superb examples are coming from Tasmania, Mornington Peninsular, Macedon Ranges and cooler parts of the Yarra Valley. 2017 will be a good year for Pinot, and also for Australian wines’ cool climate regions generally.

Chardonnay is one grape where there has been a shift in style, and 2017 could see it become even more interesting. ‘As you’re well aware there’s been a trend for quite a few years for "size zero” Chardonnay, early picked, skinny and with a very strong sulphidy character,’ says Wildman. ‘The better examples of these wines have dominated at the wine shows and therefore have further driven the style (think Vasse Felix Heytesbury, Penfolds Bin A, Oakridge 864). ’However, this style of Chardonnay has come under criticism because it’s almost as if the foot has been made to fit the slipper, and they aren’t actually all that nice to drink. As a consequence, Wildman notes, there are now fewer wines in this skinny-sulphidy style being seen. ‘The pendulum seems to have swung back (rapidly) towards the middle ground, where the wines have some weight, texture and ripeness, are not afraid of some new oak, and the sulphides have been dialed back to just a whisper of struck match, making the wines not too skinny, not too fat, but "just right”.’ He reckons that as the 2016 wines hit the shelves next year this trend for more balanced wines will increase.

 

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Quality rather than quantity: 2017 has great potential by Weingut Keller

The fascinating 2017 vintage is also one of a kind. The smallest volume here in our wi- nery since the excellent 1971. In many parcels, the Riesling yield barely exceeded 20 hl/ha. For the Pinot Noir, in some instances it was even less.
We are obviously sad because we already know that we don’t have enough wine in our cellar to satisty our customers. But from a quality perspective, the 2017 vintage makes us happy and proud. 

2017 has many of the hallmarks of the first-class 2001 and 2004 vintages: the ripeness and out and out nobility of 2001, together with the elegance and extract of 2004. Dear wine friends, if you happen to have bottles from these vintages in your cellar, they have developed into lucky charms and provide a foretaste of what we can expect from the 2017s ten years from now. A year with great potential. 

The greatest challenges: erratic weather and hailstorms 

After a frosty spring, the 2017 growing season picked up the pace and the young green shoots appeared three weeks too early. We only just escaped greater frost damage in April, with temperatures of -3.5 oC (26 oF). Others regions were more unlucky and many vinegrowers and fruit farmers lost 50–100% of their crop at this early stage. Our vines had to digest the shock of this early frost – as did we. 

The vegetation seemed to fall into a winter sleep for several weeks until mid May when summer-like temperatures clearly accelerated the growth of the canopy. June was much too dry and our vines must have felt like nomads in the desert again. Rainfall in the first six months of the year didn’t even reach half the long-term average. 

Fortunately the longed-for rain came at the end of July and a cool, damp August allo- wed the vines and us to breathe a sigh of relief. Growth and ripening proceded slowly. The water reserves that are so important for the vine had been replenished and every- thing pointed to a quiet and relaxed final ripening phase. The small bunches hung picture-perfect on the vine. 

 

Towards evening on 25 August a heavy hailstorm in Gundersheim und Westhofen dashed in a trice all hopes of a generous harvest. 

I was standing at that moment with my son Felix under the roof overhang. Felix looked as white as a sheet. The hailstones hammered on the roof and we had to look on helpless as our year’s work was brought to nothing in just a few minutes. At least that’s how it seemed at the time. When the sun reappeared there was no time to mope. We had to go on. So we jumped into the VW minibus and checked, vineyard by vineyard, the damage the storm had done. 

Fortunately the losses in Dalsheim were less than we feared. In Westhofen, however, Morstein, ABTS E and parts of Kirchenspiel had been badly hit. Had it rained after the hail, we would have lost the majority of our crop. We were very lucky that it re- mained dry. The god of the weather seemed to want to make good and sent us a wonderful Indian summer. The pleasantly warm, dry days and cool nights dried out the berries that had been hit and allowed the aromas in the healthy berries to explode. 

The small crop still on the vine developed slowly and benefited from night-time tempe- ratures of around 0 oC/32 oF. The fruit in the berries grew finer, the acidiy transpired very slowly. Sorting the berries in the ensuing harvest took a huge amount of effort. In some instances we had to inspect every single berry individually on the vine. Only the best made it into the little baskets in which we carried home the harvest in the evenings. And when, at the end of a long day’s picking with 25 helpers, only 800-1,000 litres flowed from the press instead of 4,000-5,000 litres, it was hard to see the positive side. My father Klaus, on the other hand, stood by the press beaming and said, ‘A lot and good seldom go hand in hand. The bunches look fantastic!’ And of course he was right. After 52 harvests he’s pretty much unflappable. 

It took a lot of patience and willingness to take risks to produce excellent quality in 2017. Those who hurried to rescue what could be rescued generally ended up with green, unripe characteristics and a lack of balance in the cask. 

To be perfectly honest, even I am a little surprised by how good the vintage is. And that’s exactly what we winegrowers love: after 30 or 50 harvests we continue to learn so much and are surprised time and time again. Particularly influential for quality in this vintage were the low yields. But still, many more dominoes had to fall into place for us to turn a good vintage into a very good or even a great one.

 

 

Spain’s 2017 harvest down 20%

Spain’s 2017 grape harvest is expected to be down by nearly 20% on 2016, according to provisional estimates by the Ministry of Agriculture, surpassing previous estimates of a 15% decline in the wake of spring frosts, heatwaves and drought.

Provisionally, total production of wine and must in the current 2017/18 vintage stands at 35.6 million hectoliters, compared with 44 million hectoliters in 2016 – a 19.6% drop – according to a statement released this week by Spain’s Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Food and Environment.

Based on figures from the Market Information System of the Wine Sector (INFOVI), of the 35.6 million hectoliters produced 13.6 million hectoliters has been declared as wine with Protected Designation of Origin (PDO), 3.6 million hectoliters as wine with Protected Geographical Indication (PGI), and 6.2 million hectoliters as varietal wines. The remaining wines represent 29% of total production.

Overall, production in 2017 is 19.6% lower than the previous season and 17.6% lower than the average of the previous six seasons.

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The best wines of the 2017 vintage

Name Tb Producer Location
1 Pétrus 99.0 Château Pétrus Pomerol, France
2 Lafite-Rothschild 98.5 Château Lafite-Rothschild Bordeaux, France
3 d'Yquem 98.5 Château d'Yquem Bordeaux, France
4 Château Latour 98.0 Château Latour Bordeaux, France
5 Château Haut-Brion 98.0 Château Haut-Brion Bordeaux, France
6 Château de Valandraud 98.0 Château Valandraud St.Emilion, France
7 Chateau Ducru-Beaucaillou 98.0 Château Ducru-Beaucaillou Bordeaux, France
8 Château Ausone 98.0 Château Ausone Bordeaux, France
9 Château Margaux 98.0 Château Margaux Bordeaux, France
10 Cheval Blanc 98.0 Château Cheval Blanc Bordeaux, France
11 Château L´Evangile 98.0 Château L´Evangile Pomerol, France
12 Château Mouton-Rothschild 97.5 Château Mouton-Rothschild Bordeaux, France
13 Château Haut-Brion Blanc 97.5 Château Haut-Brion Bordeaux, France
14 Vieux Chateau Certan 97.0 Vieux Château Certan Bordeaux, France
15 La Mission Haut Brion Blanc 97.0 Château La Mission Haut-Brion Bordeaux, France
16 Château Violette 97.0 Château La Violette Bordeaux, France
17 Trotanoy 97.0 Château Trotanoy Pomerol, France
18 Château Cos d'Estournel 97.0 Château Cos d'Estournel Bordeaux, France
19 Château Pavie-Macquin 97.0 Château Pavie-Macquin Bordeaux, France
20 Château Suduiraut 97.0 Château Suduiraut Bordeaux, France
21 La Mondotte 97.0 La Mondotte Bordeaux, France
22 La Mission Haut Brion 96.5 Château La Mission Haut-Brion Bordeaux, France
23 Château Smith Haut Lafitte Blanc 96.5 Château Smith Haut Lafitte Bordeaux, France
24 Pavie 96.5 Château Pavie Bordeaux, France
25 Cos d’Estournel Blanc 96.0 Château Cos d'Estournel Bordeaux, France
26 Blanc de Valandraud No. 1 96.0 Ets Thunevin Bordeaux, France
27 Château Troplong-Mondot 96.0 Château Troplong-Mondot Bordeaux, France
28 Chateau Margaux Pavillon Blanc 96.0 Château Margaux Bordeaux, France
29 Château Pichon-Longueville Baron 96.0 Château Pichon-Longueville Baron Bordeaux, France
30 Château Léoville Poyferré 96.0 Château Léoville Poyferré Bordeaux, France
31 Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey 96.0 Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey Bordeaux, France
32 Château de Figeac 96.0 Château de Figeac Saint-Emilion, France
33 Château Coutet 96.0 Château Coutet Sauternes, France
34 Chateau Beausejour Duffau-Lagarosse 96.0 Château Beausejour Duffau-Lagarosse Bordeaux, France
35 Château Canon-La-Gaffelière 96.0 Château Canon-La-Gaffelière St.Emilion, France
36 Château Clinet 96.0 Château Clinet Bordeaux, France
37 Château Guiraud 96.0 Château Guiraud Bordeaux, France
38 Château La Conseillante 96.0 Château La Conseillante Bordeaux, France
39 Léoville-Las Cases 96.0 Château Léoville-Las Cases Saint-Julien, France
40 Château Rieussec 96.0 Château Rieussec Sauternes, France
41 Château Angelus 96.0 Château Angelus Bordeaux, France
42 Domaine de Chevalier Blanc 96.0 Domaine de Chevalier Pessac Leognan, France
43 Château Pontet Canet 96.0 Château Pontet Canet Bordeaux, France
44 Château Trottevieille 96.0 Château Trottevieille Bordeaux, France
45 The Angelus 96.0 Wirra Wirra South Australia, Australia
46 Montrose 96.0 Château Montrose Bordeaux, France
47 Chateau Leoville-Barton 96.0 Château Leoville-Barton Bordeaux, France
48 Le Gay 96.0 Le Gay Bordeaux, France
49 Le Pin 95.9 Le Pin Bordeaux, France
50 Château Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande 95.5 Château Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande Bordeaux, France
51 Château Palmer 95.5 Château Palmer Bordeaux, France
52 Château Smith Haut Lafitte 95.0 Château Smith Haut Lafitte Bordeaux, France
53 Penfolds Bin 51 Riesling 95.0 Penfolds South Australia, Australia
54 Château Doisy-Daene 95.0 Château Doisy-Daëne Bordeaux, France
55 Château Haut-Bailly 95.0 Château Haut-Bailly Pessac Leognan, France
56 Château Lascombes 95.0 Château Lascombes Margaux, France
57 Château La Fleur-Pétrus 95.0 Château Lafleur-Pétrus Bordeaux, France
58 Chateau Lynch-Bages 95.0 Château Lynch-Bages Pauillac, France
59 Château Malartic-Lagraviere Blanc 95.0 Château Malartic-Lagraviere Bordeaux, France
60 Domaine de Chevalier 95.0 Domaine de Chevalier Pessac Leognan, France
61 Beau Sejour-Becot 95.0 Château Beausejour-Becot Saint-Emilion, France
62 Clos Fourtet 95.0 Clos Fourtet Bordeaux, France
63 Château Beychevelle 95.0 Château Beychevelle Bordeaux, France
64 Château Calon Ségur 95.0 Château Calon-Ségur Bordeaux, France
65 Château La Couspade 95.0 Château La Couspade St Emilion, France
66 Château Larcis Ducasse 95.0 Château Larcis Ducasse Bordeaux, France
67 Château Nenin 95.0 Château Nenin Bordeaux, France
68 Château de Rayne Vigneau 95.0 Château de Rayne Vigneau Bordeaux, France
69 Château Beauregard 95.0 Château Beauregard Bordeaux, France
70 Bélair Monange 95.0 Château Bélair Monange Bordeaux, France
71 Porongurup Riesling 95.0 Howard Park Wines Western Australia, Australia
72 Château La Tour Blance 94.0 Château La Tour Blance Sauternes, France
73 Château Grand-Mayne 94.0 Château Grand-Mayne Saint-Emilion, France
74 Château de Myrat 94.0 Château de Myrat Barsac, France
75 Château Certan De May de Certan 94.0 Château Certan de May Bordeaux, France
76 Quintus 94.0 Château Quintus St Emilion, France
77 Les Forts de Latour 94.0 Château Latour Bordeaux, France
78 Aile d'Argent 94.0 Château Mouton-Rothschild Bordeaux, France
79 Château Clerc Milon 94.0 Château Clerc Milon Bordeaux, France
80 Château D´Issan 94.0 Château D´Issan Bordeaux, France
81 Château Doisy-Vedrines 94.0 Château Doisy-Vedrines Sauternes, France
82 Château Gazin 94.0 Château Gazin Bordeaux, France
83 Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste 94.0 Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste Bordeaux, France
84 Château Fonbadet 94.0 Château Fonbadet Bordeaux, France
85 Château Cissac 94.0 Château Cissac Brdeaux, France
86 Château Hosanna 94.0 Château Hosanna Bordeaux, France
87 Château Malescot-Saint-Exupery 94.0 Château Malescot-Saint-Exupery Bordeaux, France
88 Château Carbonnieux Blanc 94.0 Château Carbonnieux Graves, France
89 Château Petit-Village 94.0 Château Petit-Village Bordeaux, France
90 Château Raymond-Lafon 94.0 Château Raymond-Lafon Bordeaux, France
91 Château Pavie-Decesse 94.0 Château Pavie-Decesse Bordeaux, France
92 Château Pape Clément Blanc 94.0 Château Pape Clément Bordeaux, France
93 Château Pape Clément 94.0 Château Pape Clément Bordeaux, France
94 Half Dry Riesling 93.0 Robert Stein Winery & Vineyard New South Wales, Australia
95 Lodge Hill Riesling 93.0 Jim Barry Wines Clare Valley, Australia
96 The Lost Watch Adelaide Hills Riesling 93.0 Wirra Wirra South Australia, Australia
97 Tasmanian Riesling 92.0 Holm Oak Vineyards Tasmania, Australia
98 Watervale Riesling 92.0 Jim Barry Wines Clare Valley, Australia
99 ‘Traditionale’ Riesling 91.5 Pikes South Australia, Australia
100 Convergence Sauvignon Blanc 91.0 Two Rivers of Marlborough Marlborough, New Zealand

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Taste wines with the Tastingbook


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