x
  • Country ranking ?

    242
  • Producer ranking ?

    6
  • Decanting time

    15min
  • When to drink

    now to 2030
  • Food Pairing

    Sashimi and sushi

The Tb points given to this wine are the world’s most valid and most up-to-date evaluation of the quality of the wine. Tastingbook points are formed by the Tastingbook algorithm which takes into account the wine ratings of the world's 50 best-known professional wine critics, wine ratings by thousands of tastingbook’s professionals and users, the generally recognised vintage quality and reputation of the vineyard and winery. Wine needs at least five professional ratings to get the Tb score. Tastingbook.com is the world's largest wine information service which is an unbiased, non-commercial and free for everyone.

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Geoffroy characterised 2008 as “a miraculous vintage” due to a cool summer and a general expectation that it would be an average year when this notion was turned on its head by a sunny September.

Chaperon added that the years 2008 and 2009 marked a period of “dynamic reflection and huge debate to make Dom Pérignon as bright, as precise as it has always been but to make it richer, more fleshy.” Both he and Geoffroy compared 2008 to 1996 due to the fresh acidity, with Geoffroy noting that 2008 had ‘muscle’.

“We consider it athletic. 2008 has more substance. It is a case of revisiting the archetype.” Chaperon continued: “We are always reading back: Without 1996 we would not have been able to stretch 2008 like this, to leverage it to another level. Every vintage is an opportunity to expand.”

 

"The 2008 Dom Pérignon is fabulous....What I admire most about the 2008 is the way it shows all the focus, translucence and energy that is such a signature of the year, and yet it is also remarkably deep and vertical. In other words, the 2008 is a Champagne that plays in three dimensions." Antonio Galloni, Vinous

"....I have no hesitation in claiming that 2008 is the greatest Dom Pérignon vintage ever produced." Tom Stevenson

 

The 2008 Dom Pérignon is fabulous, but quite remarkably, it was even more open when I tasted it a year ago. Bright, focused and crystalline in its precision, the 2008 is going to need a number of years before it is at its best. Lemon peel, white flowers, mint and white pepper give the 2008 its chiseled, bright profile. Several recent bottles have all been magnificent. What I admire most about the 2008 is the way it shows all the focus, translucence and energy that is such a signature of the year, and yet it is also remarkably deep and vertical. In other words, the 2008 is a Champagne that plays in three dimensions.

Score: 98+ Antonio Galloni, vinous.com, July 2018

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The Story

 At the end of the 17th Century, Dom Pierre Pérignon stated his ambition to create ‘the best wine in the world’.  On 29 September 1694, Dom Pierre Pérignon wrote that his mission was to create “the best wine in the world.” He dedicated himself to improving viticulture techniques, perfecting the art blending grapes from different crus, and introduced the gentle and fractional pressing to obtain white wine from black grapes.Ever since, the House of Dom Pérignon has perpetuated this visionary approach instilled by its founder, one that remains a hallmark of true luxury: the constant reinvention of the exceptional.

Under the creative leadership of cellar master Richard Geoffroy, Dom Pérignon is reinvented with every vintage. The miraculous concept of assemblage – the delicate balance between Pinot Noir and Chardonnay – and the commitment to Vintage are instrumental in the act of creation, revealing the wine's extra soul. Precise and tactile to the point of seamlessness, tense through rhythm and vibrancy, vigorous and fresh yet mature, intense and complex – such is the sensual style of Dom Pérignon: so inviting, yet so mysterious...

The core of the blend are the eight historical Grands Crus, Aÿ, Bouzy, Verzenay, Mailly, Chouilly, Cramant, Avize and Le Mesnil, plus the legendary Hautvillers Premier Cru. Dom Perignon also has the unique privilege of being able to select grapes from all 17 Grands Crus in Champagne. giving birth to Dom Perignon's highly intriguing contrast".

 

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Wine Information

“It was a miracle year,” Geoffroy began. In a decade characterised by sunny and warm summers, the grey and overcast skies of 2008 were unexpected and unwelcome. “It wasn’t proper ripening weather… so we accepted it would be an average vintage,” Geoffroy added. However, nothing in Champagne is a foregone conclusion. Indeed, as in 2000 and 2006, a miraculous September was the saviour of the vintage. As the pickers began harvesting the grapes, the weather transitioned from fine to outstanding, prompting Geoffroy to decelerate the picking process. The 2008 harvest was consequently one of the longest ever (close to a month) and maturity levels surpassed all initial expectations.

As typical for the house, Dom Pérignon 2008 is a blend of 50% Pinot Noir and 50% Chardonnay. Upon release in a few months’ time, it will have had more than 12 months post-disgorgement ageing on the cork. At the launch event this week, we tasted the new release alongside a recently disgorged Dom Pérignon P2 1996.

 

To recreate an exceptional work of art year after year by harnessing an ever-evolving creativity and ambition, this is the philosophy symbolised by the Dom Pérignon 2008 Vintage.

It is really the climate of each growing season that defines the identity of each Vintage Dom Pérignon Champagne, precious bottles of which see the light of day only after many long years spent in the cool, dark underground chalk cellars of the Champagne House. The ageing of the bottles on the lees allows Dom Pérignon Champagne to gradually transform itself, to enhance itself through various different phases of plenitude and to reveal the signature spirit of Dom Pérignon.

It is after eight full years in the making that the Dom Pérignon Vintage 2008 is finally released into the light. This is the first plenitude, representing a window through which to behold the very first phase of the ever-evolving Dom Pérignon 2008. The Dom Pérignon Vintage 2008shows off a stunning balance and perfect harmony.

In an otherwise quite solar decade, the contrasting weather conditions of the 2008 vintage were truly memorable. And yet, in the beginning of September a miracle happened. Perfectly healthy, ripe fruit was harvested, starting on September 15th.

According to Richard Geoffroy, the great Cellar Master who started his tenure at the house in 1990, "Dom Pérignon liberates the 2008 vintage, freeing it from an over-literal interpretation of the canons of Champagne."

With its bright fruit and great complexity, the aromatic bouquet opens with delicate floral notes, citrus fruits and stone fruits, along with anise and mint, which bring a nice freshness. The second nose emphasises spicy and woody notes, reminiscent of roasting. On the palate, the flavours of the Dom Pérignon 2008 Vintage are perfectly coherent with the champagne’s aromatic expression. Precise, clean and tonic, the wine displays a warm, generous bounty of fruit, further enhanced by a lively acidity. Full of flavour, the length of the finish stretches forth infinitely, offering plenty of smoky nuances.

An exceptional Champagne that will hold its own in even the most daring of wine pairings, boldy expressing its personality, full of contrasts. A singular vintage reminiscent of the legendary 1996, a perfect balance between strength, elegance and freshness that has become the signature of the great Dom Pérignon Champagne House. The Dom Pérignon 2008 Vintage, already iconic.

 

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Vintage 2008

2008 -The Champagne vintage set to make history!

A first taste of leading winemakers’ 2008 champagnes reveals a miraculous vintage, bubbling with potential, which – whisper it – might just prove the greatest in living memory.

2008 was not, by any standards, a vintage year for the financial world. And for the greater part of it, 2008 was a pretty poor year for Champagne too: spring was freezing, summer gloomy and overcast. But then, around the time that Lehman Brothers was heading for total collapse, a little miracle occurred in the vineyards of Ambonnay, Bouzy and Ay: the weather turned, the fruit started to ripen and the Champenois suddenly found themselves on course for a vintage that is now, on its release, being hailed as one of the best in a generation.

"2008 is one of the greatest champagne vintages of my lifetime," says Tom Stevenson, co-author of the Christie's World Encyclopedia of Champagne & Sparkling Wine and founder of the Champagne & Sparkling Wine World Championships. "So fine and focused, unbelievably long, with great precision, purity and intensity, yet barely perceptible weight."

High-profile 2008s launched this year includes Cristal, Dom Pérignon and Pol Roger Winston Churchill. Several more biggies are still to come, including Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame and Taittinger Comtes de Champagne. But already, 2008 is drawing comparisons with some of champagne’s most legendary vintages. "From what I have seen so far, 2008 is the best young champagne vintage I have ever tasted," says Alastair Woolmer of Farr Vintners. "The 2008s have a very similar energy and intensity to the great 1996s, but with arguably better balance and more consistency. It could well prove to be the best champagne vintage since 1988. "

"I think the 2008 is my best Cristal to date," says Jean-Baptiste Lecaillon, chef de cave of Louis Roederer (which produces the prestige cuvée Cristal). "It was a very dry, cool summer, so we have this freshness, this bright line of acidity running through the wine that is typical of great vintages and particularly great Cristal. But it has a velvety texture, too, that will no doubt give it great longevity. "

"Weatherwise, it was a vintage very much in line with 1996, but this time we tried not to make the same mistakes," he says. "In 1996 we picked too early, so we picked later in 2008. We used virtually no oak fermentation in '96, we used more in 2008. We used a little more malolactic fermentation to soften the acidity in 2008. And last, but not least, we kept it 10 years on lees, compared to '96, which we launched after just six years on the lees - that's a big difference. So I think the wines have a texture the ’96 didn’t have in the end. It's a wine with super potential. "

The vintage (£ 279 from Berry Bros & Rudd) may still be young by Cristal standards, but it's already very engaging - salty, citrusy, like pineapple dipped in seawater, with a glorious, creamy mousse. It has that characteristic Louis Roederer flawlessness, but it's also incredibly exuberant. "It's a very, very strong vintage," Lecaillon agrees. "It could be the most 'Cristal" yet of the Cristals! "

Dom Pérignon’s chef de cave Richard Geoffroy is similarly effusive about 2008. "It was a miracle year," he says. "The whole summer ripening period was so-so - gloomy, overcast, gray. We had accepted it was going to be average, but then, just a couple of days before picking, it became outstanding. So the strategy became to hold the picking back, for it to be as slow as could be. It ended up being one of the longest harvests ever, close to four weeks. So much of 2008’s grandeur comes from working with those constraints and turning them into opportunities. "

 

From far left: Louis Roederer Cristal, £ 279 from Berry Bros & Rudd. AR Lenoble Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs Chouilly, £ 63 from The Whiskey Exchange. Eric Rodez Ambonnay Grand Cru Pinot Noir Les Beurys & Les Secs, £ 92 from Wine Source. Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame, about £ 150 from Clos19. Dom Pérignon Champagne, £ 147 from Clos19

Dom Pérignon 2008 (£ 147 from Clos19) is a blend, more or less like all Dom Pérignons, of equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. The result is a wine with serious sex appeal: bright and sherbetty up top, more rich and honeyed beneath. On the nose, there’s a whiff of gunpowder - a smoldering, savory scent that’s a trademark of the house. "A lot of people draw comparisons with 1996," says Geoffroy, "but the 2008 has more substance. It's a bit more 'pumped up' - athletic, even. "

The launch of Dom Pérignon 2008 - which was previewed to a small number of journalists in June but launches properly in early 2019 - is particularly piquant for Geoffroy because it marks his retirement after 28 years as one of champagne’s most glamorous chefs de cave. Geoffroy’s shoes will be filled by his deputy, 42-year-old Vincent Chaperon - a succession that Dom Pérignon is marking with a special Legend Edition coffret for a small number of the 2008 bottles. "It's good that the transition is happening through the 2008," says Geoffroy philosophically, "because it's a vintage that's really pushing the envelope."

 

Dom Pérignon 2008 (£147 from Clos19) is a blend, more or less like all Dom Pérignons, of equal parts Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. The result is a wine with serious sex appeal: bright and sherbetty up top, more rich and honeyed beneath. On the nose, there’s a whiff of gunpowder – a smouldering, savoury scent that’s a trademark of the house. “A lot of people draw comparisons with 1996,” says Geoffroy, “but the 2008 has more substance. It’s a bit more ‘pumped up’ – athletic, even.”

The launch of Dom Pérignon 2008 – which was previewed to a small number of journalists in June but launches properly in early 2019 – is particularly piquant for Geoffroy because it marks his retirement after 28 years as one of champagne’s most glamorous chefs de cave. Geoffroy’s shoes will be filled by his deputy, 42-year-old Vincent Chaperon – a succession that Dom Pérignon is marking with a special Legend Edition coffret for a small number of the 2008 bottles. “It’s good that the transition is happening through the 2008,” says Geoffroy philosophically, “because it’s a vintage that’s really pushing the envelope.”

2008 was also a seismic year for Veuve Clicquot: cellar master Dominique Demarville was so impressed by the quality of the Pinot Noir that he made a major adjustment to the house’s prestige cuvée La Grande Dame (about £150 from Clos19), bumping up the percentage of Pinot Noir from 60 per cent to 92 per cent (with the remaining eight per cent being Chardonnay) – a change that he’s maintained ever since. “I had wanted to increase the amount of Pinot Noir in La Grande Dame to give it a stronger signature, to get that full body and length, for some time. And 2008 was a great year for Pinot Noir,” he says. “The gentle ripening season resulted in base wines with wonderful balance – depth and richness and body and acidity.” Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame 2008 is majestic: succulent, firm and full of apple and bramble fruit, borne on a great whoosh of fine, silky fizz. Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame 2008 will be released in early 2019.

Different houses interpret a vintage in different ways, but the hallmark of 2008 is that brilliant, mouth‑watering acidity. In a blind tasting I did of 2008s and ’09s with Nick Baker of champagne merchants The Finest Bubble, the ’09s were consistently more fruity, more evolved and often deeper in colour, while the ’08s were brighter, tighter and more high-definition. You could spot them a mile off.

Partly as a consequence of that acidity, the 2008 vintage has, as a rule, matured more slowly than 2009, a fact that led a number of houses, including Dom Pérignon, to break with tradition and release the two vintages in reverse chronological order: 2009 first, 2008 second.

Having said that, I think many of the 2008s are already tasting absolutely delicious. And a couple have already won top awards. At the Champagne & Sparkling Wine World Championships 2017, the Chairman’s Trophy went to AR Lenoble’s 2008 Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs Chouilly (£63 from The Whisky Exchange) – a luxuriant champagne that proved 2008 wasn’t just a year for Pinot Noir but Chardonnay too. “The vintage 2008 in Champagne was the best vintage following 2002,” says Antoine Malassagne, winemaker and co-owner of AR Lenoble with his sister Anne. “The rich, natural creaminess found in our Chardonnay grapes from the grand cru village of Chouilly was able to express itself beautifully.”

Piper-Heidsieck’s crystalline 2008 (£70 from The Finest Bubble) won World Champion Vintage Brut Blend in the same competition. “If 2008 has any flaw, it is that its wines are so perfect,” says CSWWC chairman Tom Stevenson. “Truly talented chefs de cave are skilled at blending together interlocking components of imperfection. Even in great years, it is the blender’s skill at the assemblage that creates a polished champagne, but in 2008, each base wine was so beautifully balanced in its own right that combining them threatened to do more harm than good. Some got it wrong and produced champagnes that were too angular and mean, but plenty of others made great 2008s. Many of the very best 2008s have yet to be released, but I have no hesitation in claiming that 2008 is the greatest Dom Pérignon vintage ever produced.”

2008 may have come good in the end, but for many, at the time, it was incredibly stressful. The sheer exhaustion of nurturing vines during a tricky growing season – which often called for night forays into the vineyards – caused Eric Rodez, a former cellar master at Krug, who now makes a range of cult cuvées under his own name, to press two separate plots of Pinot Noir as one, a mistake he only realised after bottling. “As a result, what is normally Les Beurys in any other vintage is Les Beurys & Les Secs Pinot Noir 2008 that year,” he admits, cheerfully. “This wine should not be made again, it is unique to 2008.” 

Rodez’s mistake will no doubt only add to the cachet of his 2008 Ambonnay Grand Cru Pinot Noir Les Beurys & Les Secs (£92 from Wine Source) – a champagne marked by aromatic, cherry fruitiness and fresh minerality. But he still has some more surprises up his sleeve. “We have in the cellars two secret cuvées to be released when the time comes,” he reveals, cryptically. “Patience, patience.”

I’ve tasted fantastic 2008s from the cooperatives too. In the 08/09 blind tasting with The Finest Bubble, Palmer & Co Brut Millésimé 2008 squared up magnificently to the prestige cuvées – it combined a shimmering, almost Roederer-like citrussiness with the snap of pale, buttery shortbread. A great buy at £46.95 a bottle for a case of 12.

If you move fast, there may also still be a few bottles left of Berry Bros & Rudd’s own-label 2008 (£36 each), produced by the Mailly cooperative in the Montagne de Reims – a champagne that’s all pale stone fruit and lean, chalky purity.

There is a lot about the 2008s that’s already pretty irresistible – but hold off drinking them for now, if you can, says Alastair Woolmer. “At this early stage, they are fascinating to taste, but due to their laser-like acidity, they will only reveal their true potential and pleasure with about 20 years of age. Truly great champagne vintages like this need bottle age to be at their best. This is a vintage to go long on and reap the rewards in years to come.”

by Alice Lascelles.

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Latest Pro-tasting notes

67 tasting notes

Tasting note

color

Medium, Green-Yellow and Bright

ending

Medium, Round and Pure

flavors

Vanilla, Honey, Nutty, Buttery, Citrus and Dried-fruit

nose

Youthful, Pure, Fresh and Ripe

recommend

Yes

taste

Balanced, Complex, Full-bodied, Round, Harmonious and Vigor

Verdict

Transparent and Sophisticated

Written Notes

This champagne seems to have received endless accolades from anyone who has tasted to it, so this is simply adding to the swelling adoration.

2008 is proving itself worthy of the hype – any vintage compared with 1988, my fave vintage, will certainly get my attention and it seems a just comparison. It has turned out to be the perfect champagne to bring Richard’s glittering career to a deserved conclusion.

The wine itself is pretty much an equal split of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, wonderfully complex with precision, finesse, piercing length and knife-edge balance. Notes of honey, florals, grapefruit, gunflint, stonefruit and more. Slight hints of nuts and even sesame seeds with an oystershell-like salinity. This is a wine which will age for a very long time, though is glorious now. Dosage is just 5 grams/litre. There is an entrancing, graceful power behind it. Its subsequent incarnations, P2 and P3, should be even more deserving of reverential awe, whenever they come to the market (don’t hold your breath – it will be many years). Even the wine in its current form, should be cellared for as long as you can. For me, 98, with potential to go even higher.

  • 98p
Good looking normal size bottle and in an perfect condition. Colour is green-yellow, and looking bright and medium. On the nose it is youthful, fresh, pure, seductive and ripe. The taste is harmonious, vigor, perfumed, fresh, round, full-bodied, with balanced and complex structure. On the palate it is layered and has nutty, perfumed, vanilla, tropical fruits, honey, citrus, buttery and dried-fruit flavours. The finish is medium long, round, flavorful, pure and vibrant. This wine is sophisticated, transparent and fine. I paid around 100-200€ a bottle. Perfectly stored bottles are still very worthy and will last well for another 10-15 years and decant at least 15min before tasting. Good value for money. I do recommend.
- (Tasting note created by Tb's AI)
  • 95p

The finest release of this iconic cuvée since the 1996 vintage, the 2008 Dom Pérignon wafts from the glass with an incipiently complex bouquet of Meyer lemon, green apple, dried white flowers and oyster shell, with only subtle hints of the smoky, autolytic aromas that have been such a prominent signature of recent releases. On the palate, the wine is medium to full-bodied, deep and complete, its notable flesh and amplitude controlled by incisive acids, with a youthfully exuberant but elegant mousse and a long, beautifully delineated finish. Considering the sheer size of this cuvée, it's a remarkable achievement and a fitting release with which to conclude Richard Geoffroy's tenure as chef de cave. Given the 2008's intensity and balance, I suspect purists will be anticipating later disgorgements with lower dosage and more time on the lees with particular enthusiasm. Tasted three times, with consistent results.

The eagerly anticipated 2008 Dom Pérignon was at last released at the end of 2018, and happily, I had the chance to taste it with the charismatic outgoing Chef de Caves, Richard Geoffroy, at an event in Beaune. I subsequently retasted the wine several times at my office in the United States. As the release of this vintage marks Geoffroy's retirement—effective January 1, 2019—after 28 years with Dom Pérignon, it also marks an important event in Dom Pérignon's history, commemorated by a special label. It's fair to say that Geoffroy's tenure has transformed this cuvée, and what he has achieved is certainly impressive. Since 2003, which few Champagne houses declared as a vintage and which Geoffroy made waves by opting to release, Dom Pérignon has been produced in every year with the sole exception of 2007, reflecting a decision to embrace the personality of each vintage more wholeheartedly. While cynics might observe that this decision has obvious commercial appeal, the wines have largely justified it—even if some vintages are obviously stronger than others. Geoffroy has also sought to pick riper fruit, harvesting late by the standards of the region in pursuit of more mature grapes. Especially for a cuvée of this size (production is confidential, but most estimates land north of five million bottles), that's decidedly unusual, reflecting an admirable willingness to take risks in pursuit of quality.

Dom Pérignon today delivers more flesh, vinosity and texture than it did two decades ago. To my palate, the wine would be even more exciting if those qualities, admirable in themselves, could be married with greater energy and incisiveness—and perhaps slightly lower dosage—but that's likely an unreasonable counsel of perfection at this scale. Geoffroy's successor, Vincent Chaperon, has worked with his predecessor for the last 13 years, and it will be exciting to follow Dom Pérignon's evolution under his direction. In any case, the 2008 is unlikely to disappoint readers, as this ripe but racy vintage has synergized beautifully with the Dom Pérignon style. As readers will know, winemaking here is quite reductive, with the vins clairs vinified in stainless steel on the lees with full malolactic fermentation, followed by bottling and eight to ten years sur lattes before the first disgorgement. Yet the 2008 is less overtly autolytic and reductive in style out of the gates than the last handful of Dom Pérignon releases. Geoffroy's perception of the 2008 vintage is very much linked to reflection on the 1996 vintage, a heralded year that he feels was generally picked prematurely, before the fruit had attained full phenolic development.

And while the 1996 Dom Pérignon is one of several undeniably superb wines produced in that year, Geoffroy's observation does appear to be supported by the disappointing evolution of more than a few 1996s today. With the similarly styled 2008 vintage, the Dom Pérignon team therefore sought riper grapes, and the wine is clearly richer and—as Geoffroy puts it—more muscular than the 1996, though cut from similar cloth. To my palate, it's also the finest Dom Pérignon since the 1996, displaying a racier, more lively profile than the 2002, and it should be a very promising candidate for extended bottle age. In addition to my tasting note on the 2008, I've also taken this opportunity to publish a couple of recent notes on later disgorgements of Dom Pérignon and Dom Pérignon Rosé.

  • 95p

A wonderful bottle with very typical character. Champagne colour with fine perlage. Classic nose with aroma reminiscent of flintstone, fine toasting touches, Brioche, ripe yellow stone fruit, tangerine peel, hints of vanilla, ripe apricots, complex nose. On the palate excellent mousseux, fine acidity, creamy texture, repeating the flavour of the nose, excellent depth and length. A wonderful, classic bottle.

  • 98p

The 2008 Dom Pérignon is the first time the estate has released a wine out of order (the 2009 was released before the 2008) but the estate loved the wine so much they felt it warranted additional aging. This is a rich, powerful wine that still shows incredible purity and elegance, with a stacked, concentrated feel on the palate. It’s rare to find such a mix of ripe, pure, concentrated fruit paired with this level of purity, focus, and precision. This is a legendary Dom that surpasses all the great vintages of Dom I have experience with, including the 1990, 1996, and 2002.

  • 98p

The best Dom since 2002. A vintage with very restrained, powerful style that has been released non-sequentially after the 2009. This has a lighter stamp of highly curated, autolytic, toasty aromas than many recent releases. Instead, this delivers super fresh and intense aromas of lemons, grapefruit and blood-orange peel. Incredible freshness here. The palate has a very smoothly delivered, berry-pastry thread with light, sweet spices, stone fruit and fine citrus fruit. This really delivers. Drink now or hold.

  • 98p

Tasted in August 2019 in Helsinki, Finland. One of the 20 champagnes tasted. Beautifully scented nose, very complex, rich and long, sublime, sophisticated. Immensely impressive. The winner of the tasting in my opinion

  • 98p
Good looking half size bottle, in an perfect condition and level is 2cm ullage below the cork.
- (Tasting note created by Tb's AI)

This is all sunny and delicious 2008, with brightness infusing the wine, from its platinum color to its mineral intensity, transforming its richness and power into cool elegance. Notes of agave and cassia bark add depth, suggesting the complexity this will develop greatly with further bottle age. 

  • 97p

The 2008 Dom Pérignon is fabulous, but quite remarkably, it was even more open when I tasted it a year ago. Bright, focused and crystalline in its precision, the 2008 is going to need a number of years before it is at its best. Lemon peel, white flowers, mint and white pepper give the 2008 its chiseled, bright profile. Several recent bottles have all been magnificent. What I admire most about the 2008 is the way it shows all the focus, translucence and energy that is such a signature of the year, and yet it is also remarkably deep and vertical. In other words, the 2008 is a Champagne that plays in three dimensions.

  • 98p

The first impression is  fresh almonds, then yellow-flesh fruit aromas evoking peach and mango; toasted, roasted notes accompanied with dried citrus and pink grapefruit. There is a lovely aromatic fullness with honey flavors and a smooth chalky texture on the palate, followed by candied lemon notes and a delicious bitterness, ending on a wonderfully refreshing and intense finish. One of the best Dom Pérignon ever!

  • 98p

Dom Pérignon 2008 / 18.5p / This keenly-anticipated wine has deliberately been held back to be released after the Dom Pérignon 2009 and in fact will not be released commercially until towards the end of 2018 (although it already seems pretty good to me). Geoffroy reminded me that the growing season was no picnic - in fact he described all but the end of it as 'miserable' because it was so overcast and the disease pressure was so high. Fine weather at the end finally ripened the grapes though acid levels were notably high. I wondered whether, since the grapes were harvested just as the global financial crisis was beginning to bite, they reduced the quantity made of Dom P, but no. 'We made lots!', he assured me. 
Brisk, tiny mousse. Notably rich nose - very Dom P! There's a hint of something marine on the nose (Michael Broadbent's oyster shells?) and then extremely tight and lacy - it somehow reminded me of a sponge because of springy texture. Masses of energy here, as well as the usual flirtatiousness. It will continue to open out, I'm sure. I tasted it very cool and then went back to it at almost room temperature a couple of hours later and it stood up extremely well. The official Geoffroy description of this vintage is 'athletic' and 'vertical'. 'All 2008s are bright in terms of fruit; we want ours to shine white light. We have deliberately warmed it up a bit, working on the muscle to better integrate the acidity.'

  • 95p

Dom Pérignon 2008 Legacy Edition had an exclusive launch in Finland. It was such a joy to celebrate the launch with Dom Pérignon Club in Hotel Kämp! Absolutely astonishing champagne - expect it to be 100-pointer in future, now 97 points! So pure, energetic, vibrant, and concentrated. The dry mouthfeel is refined but rich with intense mousse. Long and lingering aftertaste with great precision. Thank you Aki Keskitalo and team Kämp, and Philipp and Pekka from Moet Hennessy Finland! And thank you Richard Geoffroy and Vincent Chaperon for creating such a super champagne! Long live your Legacy!

  • 97p

Superbly showing toasty nose with fragrant smokiness, mint, licorice and heps of freshly ground coffee. Tightly-wound palate with mineral crispness and salty tones. Still surprisingly creamy-textured and mellow with plenty of vivacity energising the back palate. 

  • 95p
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Information

Origin

Reims, Champagne

Other wines from this producer

Brut Impérial

Dom Pérignon Oenothèque

Dom Pérignon Oenothèque Rosé

Dom Pérignon P2

Dom Pérignon P2 Rosé

Dom Pérignon P3

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Dom Pérignon Rosé

Dom Pérignon Rosé P3

Grand Vintage

Grand Vintage Collection

Grand vintage rosé

MCIII

Moët Ice Impérial

Nectar Imperial

Nectar Imperial Rosé Dry

Rosé Impérial

Saran

Vinothèque

Vintage

Vintage rosé

Inside Information

The aesthetic ideal of Dom Pérignon

The sensory universe of Dom Pérignon is infinitely complex—or at least that’s how it appears to me. Attempting to map it out is a daunting task. How would I know? Because I have tried! Ever since I became Dom Pérignon’s chef de cave, I have strived to experience, explore and sense the singularity of Dom Pérignon. Each person I meet contributes to this by sharing a unique view of Dom Pérignon, which in turn nourishes my inspiration.

One such person is Alexandre Schmitt, a trained perfumer who decided to bring his expertise to the world of wine. During our first encounter, we started by focusing on the aromatic palette of Dom Pérignon. One idea leading to another, we ended up discussing extensively the concept of objectifying subjectivity—turning sensations, reflexively linked to memories and inherently personal, into perceptions that can be precisely identified and can thus gain somewhat of a universal quality.

Our brains intuitively turn sensations into mere evocations, reaching out to souvenirs, impressions and emotions. In this sense perception operates associatively: this is why various tasters can name a combination of aromas differently based on their own experiences. It therefore becomes all the more important to delimit a common ground allowing us to share our perceptions with each other. I plan to provide significant examples in two upcoming entries revolving around Dom Pérignon vintages from 2002 to 2006, and the concept of Plénitudes.

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Highlights

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VINTAGE NEWS: 1945 / Tastingbook’s TOP 10 wines from 1947&1945 tasting  (66 wines tasted) 1. Chât  more ...
TASTINGBOOK WINE NEWS BWW 2020 - Best Wine Shop of the World have been selected  / Millésima from France is the Winner.
TASTINGBOOK WINE NEWS ROBERT PARKER’S ‘MAGICAL 20’ THRIVING IN 2020 / Buyers who took a punt on Robert Parker’s ‘Magical 20’ Bordeaux wines from the 2009 vintage would be looking at average gains of 40% today, according to Liv-ex.
TASTINGBOOK WINE NEWS Neil Hadley MW elected chair of the Institute of Masters of Wine / Neil Hadley MW has become the first Australian to head the Institute of Masters of Wine
WINE NEWS: Castillo Ygay Gran Reserva Especial 2010 / CASTILLO YGAY, CHOSEN AS BEST GRAN RESERVA IN THE WORLD Falstaff magazine, one of the most presti  more ...
WINE NEWS: Grange Hermitage 1951 / Penfolds' chief winemaker reveals the secret to the perfect plonk after bottle of the famous Gra  more ...
WINERY NEWS Krug / A New Chapter at Krug Champagne Julie Cavil succeeds longtime winemaker and mentor Eric Lebel as   more ...
TASTINGBOOK WINE NEWS Symington Family Estates Launches "School of Port" / New digital platform will provide education and training for wine professionals and wine lovers alike to learn more about Port and the Douro region
WINE NEWS: Dom Pérignon 2010 / The luminous sweetness of tropical fruit – green mango, melon, pineapple – instantly shi  more ...
VINTAGE NEWS: 1945 / Tastingbook’s TOP 10 wines from 1947&1945 tasting  (66 wines tasted) 1. Chât  more ...
WINERY NEWS Château Margaux /          VINTAGE  more ...
TASTINGBOOK WINE NEWS 100 Best Champagnes for 2020  / Dom Pérignon is a winner again!
WINERY NEWS Warre's / The New Normal 2019 Douro Harvest Report It is easy for visitors to the Douro to assume that  more ...
WINERY NEWS Diamond Creek Vineyards / Louis Roederer Champagne to buy Diamond Creek Vineyards Roederer is about to add another gem, Dia  more ...
TASTINGBOOK WINE NEWS One of the most famous names in the global wine trade, Michael Broadbent MW, has died aged 92. / Robert Joseph remembers Michael Broadbent MW, who led an extraordinary life in wine.

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